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of president obama and republican presidential candidate mitt romney. this is about 45 minutes. rebecca wilkens joins us from citizens for tax justice and the other guest is the resident scholar at the american enterprise institute. we're here to talk about tax plans. rebecca wilkens -- where are they different on taxes? >> both candidates propose extending the bush tax cuts. governor romney wants to extend all the tax cuts. president obama just wants to extend them for those making less than $250,000. that is a fairly significant difference. that would have a that a $1 trillion cost. romney wants to reduce individual rates by 20% across the board and also reduce the corporate rate down to 25%. president obama proposed reducing them to 20%. guest: i think that is a fair description. host: we heard that the debate in denver about where romney stands on his tax plan. here is a headline coming to us -- there is little tax clarity from the obama or romney. $5 trillion -- whether or not tax cuts will equal $5 trillion. there is difference over this number. guest: the $5 trillion is the gross cost of
the difference between governor romney and myself, when he talked about those in poverty, i said they haven't chosen to be there. i would not cut our food stamp programs now because we need to make sure those folks can continue to be taken care of. but let's get them a job and get them back to work so families can progress. >> thank you, mrs. mcmahon. mr. murphy. >> again, this is just about numbers. if you except this tax cut number, the only way to account for it is to have massive cut to these programs that do put people to work and grow jobs and take care people when they are out of work. you have to look at the work i have done. i've committed my life to standing up to the most vulnerable among us. some of the work i do on these issues may be don't get the big headlines. i wrote a piece of legislation, the support of housing investment act, named after a great advocate for anti-homeless here in connecticut that would triple the amount of housing units built for the most vulnerable among us. people have very grave mental illnesses and physical handicaps that can live on their own if the
Search Results 0 to 1 of about 2